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Author Topic: A philosophy professor's question about bronies  (Read 280 times)

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A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« on: April 06, 2014, 10:38:00 PM »
Before I was a fan of Friendship is Magic, I was an an avid skeptic. It's been amusing to witness well-known skeptics I've been following just recently discover brony fandom.

Today, philosophy professor Dan Fincke asked on his Facebook page: "Has My Little Pony never gone away or has it recently had a renaissance of popularity? Is there are relatively new show the last few years that's made it more visible again or is it just that adults who grew up on it post it everywhere online out of nostalgia?"

After being informed about the brony phenomenon, he asked:

"Under what conditions would you take an adult's enthusiasm for something in children's media to be a symptom of immaturity?"

What would be your answer to this question?

Offline Montag

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2014, 11:42:04 PM »
How exactly is this professor defining maturity? That would be kind of helpful before we go about answering such questions.

Offline Snowy Flanks

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2014, 01:29:23 AM »
according to websters mature means 'having or showing the mental and emotional qualities of an adult' emotional maturity includes:  the ability to listen to and evaluate the viewpoints of others, ability to separate true love from transitory infatuation, ability to see the various shades of grey between the extremes of black and white in every situation. I see this as the the ability to see something, consider it and then make an informed decision about it. If there mental and emotional growth is not stunted by enthusiasm for something in children's media then it is not a symptom of immaturity

Also his question is leading so :(

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Offline jdb1984

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2014, 08:52:18 AM »
As long as you do the stuff all responsible adults have to do (go to work, pay bills, keep your living space relatively clean, etc), that is a sign of maturity.  Whether you like a cartoon or not has nothing to do with it, in my eyes.


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Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2014, 11:34:44 AM »
I would probably end up quoting C.S. Lewis at him:

To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.
On Three Ways of Writing for Children (1952)

I suspect quoting C. S. Lewis as a philosophy professor is an instant way to lose his respect, but so what?

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Offline Passacaglia

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2014, 03:40:12 PM »
I would probably end up quoting C.S. Lewis at him:

To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.
On Three Ways of Writing for Children (1952)

I suspect quoting C. S. Lewis as a philosophy professor is an instant way to lose his respect, but so what?



Not every philosophy professor... my uncle is one and he likes CS Lewis.

Great choice of quote, by the way. I agree wholeheartedly.
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Online Chica

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2014, 09:31:16 PM »
After being informed about the brony phenomenon, he asked:

"Under what conditions would you take an adult's enthusiasm for something in children's media to be a symptom of immaturity?"

What would be your answer to this question?

Seeing as people liking certain media (TV shows, movies, games, books, etc.) has nothing to with a person's maturity, the answer is a simple "never".

People who like children's oriented media can be mature, just as people who like adult oriented media can be immature. Hell, I know a bunch of people who like children's media (myself included) who are among the more mature people I know at my school. Yet there are so many students who enjoy adult and teenage media, and are some the most immature people I've ever met.
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Offline HoofBitingActionOverload

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2014, 11:05:39 PM »
How exactly is this professor defining maturity? That would be kind of helpful before we go about answering such questions.
He seems to be heavily implying immaturity is some sort of disease.

I've never understood why people look maturity in such black and white terms. Maturity has a lot of different layers, and everyone develops differently. A person can be responsible in their work and still be emotionally immature. A person can be emotionally mature but lack motivation. I'm not sure what entertainment has to do with any of it.

Online Sincerity

Re: A philosophy professor's question about bronies
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2014, 11:15:43 PM »
I would probably end up quoting C.S. Lewis at him:

To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.
On Three Ways of Writing for Children (1952)

I suspect quoting C. S. Lewis as a philosophy professor is an instant way to lose his respect, but so what?
Seeing as people liking certain media (TV shows, movies, games, books, etc.) has nothing to with a person's maturity, the answer is a simple "never".

People who like children's oriented media can be mature, just as people who like adult oriented media can be immature. Hell, I know a bunch of people who like children's media (myself included) who are among the more mature people I know at my school. Yet there are so many students who enjoy adult and teenage media, and are some the most immature people I've ever met.
I agree with both of these. What media you consume has little to do with your maturity. Maybe it's correlated or something, but you can't possibly assume that being a fan of children's media is automatically immature.
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